Cover reveal and the London Book Fair

Drrrrrum rrrrroll please! It’s my pleasure this Sunday evening to share my new book cover!

JFTH Ebook cover small

 

Avon Books UK has given me another fabulous cover, one I’m proud to have on my book. Paperback, ebook and audio book will all be released on 18 May 2017 and you can get your preorder in hereJust for the Holidays is about Leah Beaumont who, having made a decision not to marry or have children, finds herself stuck in France looking after her sister’s husband and kids. But, hey, it’s just for the holidays, right? Well, whether you’re headed for an exotic beach or prefer something closer to home, Leah’s holiday is probably going to make your summer feel pretty good.

Apart from getting excited about that pretty cover, I spent three days last week enjoying the delights of the London Book Fair. It’s a giant trade fair where agents, publishers and those who provide services or products to them, can meet to do business. There are two massive halls and two big galleries filled with stands from all over the world.

So, what is an author doing there? I treat it rather like a conference and go along to absorb information. As well as an opportunity to see what publishers are publishing this year, there are many talks/panels/presentations taking place. Many of them aren’t aimed at me but I’m interested, so in I go. My personal highlights were a debate on whether Brexit will be good for publishing; a talk by Michael Morpurgo, children’s author; and meeting face-to-face for the first time Karen Byrom, the fiction editor of My Weekly. Expect to see a short story and Just for the Holidays giveaway in My Weekly in May, a Christmas two-parter in December, and a little promo idea Karen and I cooked up that I’m sitting on for now.

I also use the Fair as a place to meet other authors and friends for a cuppa, a chat, lunch or dinner. It’s tiring; I walked an average of seven miles a day, but I love it. To share the love, I put together a bit of a pin board for you below.

 

LBF 17 pastiche

Top row, L-R: Michael Morpurgo, the view from the gallery, the audience gathers ahead of Mr Morpurgo’s talk, spring hits London Olympia, the HarperCollins stand.

Bottom row, L-R: pity they didn’t have my size, London and the Thames in the sunshine (no, this isn’t close to Olympia), Christina Courtenay and I are not afraid of some big shark, the Independent Publishers’ Guild stands, decorative rather than for reading.

 

A night to remember

Candles and chandeliers. And books. It’s a fabulous setting.

Last night the Romantic Novelists Association held their Romantic Novel of the Year Awards Ceremony. This is a glittering evening of canapés and bubbles in the wonderful Gladstone Library in Whitehall Place.

It was particularly special for me this year, because my book Little Girl Lost was shortlisted for the Epic Romantic Novel of the year – a category that includes books with a central romance at the heart, but that cover broader issues and themes as well.

To cut a long story short – I WON!!!!

Yes.. I cried. In fact, the lovely Prue Leith who was handing out the awards gave me her tissues. Thank you Prue.

I was so excited, I can barely remember my acceptance speech – but a few people have told me it was very nice.

Also very nice is the beautiful glass star that now sits in my office.

 

It is so pretty!!!!

Thank you to the RNA, and the judges and the award organisers and everyone involved. I am thrilled and honoured to hold this award. I have now written three Coorah Creek novels – and all three are award winners. It’s going to take a long time for the smile on my face to fade.

The three Coorah Creek novels. I am very proud of them.

 

A double whammy…

Just two days after sharing my news about being shortlisted of an award in the US – guess what? The Wild one has done it again.

It is now a finalist in the Aspen Gold readers Choice Award – sponsored by the heart of Denver RWA chapter. Wow.
the first book in the series, Flight to Coorah Creek won this award last year, so its doubly exciting to be shortlisted again.
I’m still afraid this is all a jet-lag induced dream.

Both awards are announced in October – please keep your fingers crossed for me (although that does make typing difficult).

Pretty...

Pretty…

Taking the technical terror out of talks

Jenny, Sue and I had a great time last week at the Romantic Novelists Association conference (see the previous post)… for me there was also a bit of work involved.

I have the honour (is that the right word – I’m not so sure) to be the RNA’s geek girl. My day job involves television and complex computer systems, and I am therefore member who looks after all things technology for the RNA.

I spent a lot of the weekend running around (well – actually hobbling around due to injured foot) making sure all the speakers were happily attached to projectors, computers and microphones. And I also gave a workshop on the technology of giving talks.

Here I am - with a very very big screen, giving a talk at a previous RNA conference.

Here I am – with a very very big screen, giving a talk at a previous RNA conference.

Almost every author I know gives talks – to conferences, writing groups, educational institutions, the WI – and even on cruise ships. It’s part of the job description. I often get emails from panicking friends saying things like – I have to give this talk and they say they only have HDMI. What’s that? Can I plug my Mac into it?

Talks are scary enough without the technical terror, so I thought I should offer up some help.

If you want to connect your computer to a large screen TV or a projector, there are two primary ways to do this.

VGA is a 15 point plug that outputs only the screen display, usually to a projector. There is no audio. This is most commonly found in places like the WI.

A VGA cable and port. The other end of the cable is attached to the projector or sometimes a TV.

A VGA cable and port. The other end of the cable is attached to the projector or sometimes a TV.

Sometimes your computer will automatically adjust itself and the image on your laptop screen will just appear on the big screen. If not, go into your Control Panel –> display and screen resolution to find the place where you tell it to detect another screen.

If you need audio when using a projector with VGA, you will need external speakers. I have a cheap pair of speakers I take with me. Some venues will have their own permanent speakers and a cable that you just plug in the same way you plug in your headphones. If you are including a video in your presentation, make sure you check the audio situation.

HDMI  is more recent technology and is used to connect to a big screen TV or a proper multi-media desk. It shares both sounds and the screen.

HDMI connections. The plug looks the same at both ends. This is for large screen TVs

HDMI connections. The plug looks the same at both ends. This is for large screen TVs

Most new laptops no longer have VGA ports. They only have HDMI. You are going to need a converter to attach to an older projector. You can buy a HDMI to VGA adapter online or at any electronics/computer store for £10-20. Remember, if at any point you go through a VGA port, you will not have audio at the other end.

If you have a MAC – you won’t have either VGA or HDMI – so you will have to get a proper MAC to VGA or Mac to HDMI converter. These are easy to buy and work just fine.

A MAC to HDMI converter. There's a similar one for VGA too.

A MAC to HDMI converter. There’s a similar one for VGA too.

The final piece of technology you need is what is known in the trade as a clicker thingy. These require a USB port on the laptop.

Most clickers also have a laser pointer included. The laser won't work on most TV screens.

Most clickers also have a laser pointer included. The laser won’t work on most TV screens.

Using a remote clicker allows you to move away from the laptop, walk around as you talk and wave your arms around too. Try not to do what I did and wave your arms with such enthusiasm that you accidentally throw the clicker thingy into a wall and break it. Oops.

Ok – so that’s the technology – I hope that helps.

Over on my blog at www.janetgover.com, I am talking about the slide presentation itself and how to make it entertaining and interesting. It’s all about bouncing balls and honeycomb wipes. Do drop over for a look.

A whole lot of romance

Take around 200 romantic novelists and what do you get? A conference, apparently! The Romantic Novelists’ Association conference at Lancaster University certainly didn’t disappoint, with an amazing buzz for the best part of three days.

The RNA is a diverse and incredibly supportive organisation. Writers of all ages, published, unpublished and self-published belong, and new writers are mentored through those painful early days towards publication. At the conference, there are talks and workshops on just about every aspect of writing a novel you can think of – but the best part of it is meeting new writers, making new friends and catching up with old friends.

Three Take Five Authors members were there enjoying the fun this year. Janet Gover and Jenny Harper and Sue Moorcroft.

A common pastime for me during the weekend. It's much better now.

A common pastime for Janet during the weekend. It’s much better now.

 

Janet says: I had a wonderful time and came back totally inspired. It wasn’t just the talks and workshops. They were full of useful information… but I learned something else this year. The night before conference, I hurt my foot, and at one stage thought I would be unable to go. I put out an SOS and so many of my RNA friends were there to help – with a lift to the venue, carrying my things, even dashing out to buy frozen peas to help my swollen foot. For me, that really sums up the friendship I find in the RNA.

 

Jenny says: The Conference is a great time for renewing old friendships and forging new ones – and I had a ball doing both. The only frustrating thing is that there are often two or more sessions running at the same time, so you simply can’t do everything. I’m delighted that I chose to attend the crime workshop. I don’t write crime, but I now know where to turn for accurate information if I ever need it – and it was fascinating. Roll on next year!

Janet and Jenny catching up at the conference.

Janet and Jenny catching up at the conference.

Sue says: I spent a lot of time catching up with my friends in the dining room, the bar and at kitchen parties (invaluable networking) but I also attended some great sessions. The two on commercial fiction were especially useful as I’m teaching a course on the subject in October and the ‘Together we stand panel’ of industry professionals was just fascinating. The conference always gives me a huge buzz!

Sue with RNA President Katie Fforde

Sue with RNA President Katie Fforde